Wednesday, October 05, 2011

HOW TO MAKE A COMIC STORY THAT IS GUARANTEED TO SELL!

http://cinch.fm/subwaysurfer/293405

4 comments:

Thomas said...

Hi Elgin,

Did you pick this up from Quentin Tarantino? I remember him proffering similar advice. Keep em coming...

Elgin Subwaysurfer Bolling said...

No, I didn't know Quentin said this at all, but being the perceptive guy he is, I ain't surprised. I was trolling YouTube listening to various artist interviews back to back and then I saw this obvious pattern that hit me like a ton of bricks. Just imagine! Your story, your life is actually interesting enough to resonate with SOMEBODY! And they will pay you to share your memories and observations. Knowing this takes all the hard work a d mystery out of it. If you do nothing NOW with this info, you're just lazy in my book.

Thomas said...

Tarantino didn't just say that, I remember many a writing book covering this kind of process too. Probably the greatest proponent of this type of comic writing would the the late Harvey Pekar in American Splendor. Whereas George Herriman (Krazy Kat) invented all his dialogue and based the overarching theme on an operatic love triangle. As for the guarantee, selling wise, I'm not too worried on that count, but I guess some may be. I'm taking time to learn the form, crystallize the narrative and--hopefully--draw the pages in compelling fashion. It may not even be "action packed", though that is a consideration to be sure. Story-boarding the rascal is fun though and adapting my drawing to a comic style is a challenge too. I'm not completely fluent in the visual comic nomenclature, but--to date--sound drawing has never let me down. Presently, it seems the key adaptation in my case can be summed up in one word...simplification. If not, I"ll be drawing the dang thing until I qualify for senior assistance.

Elgin Subwaysurfer Bolling said...

Harvey Pekar took this principle and ran with it as has many an underground artist from the sixties like the aforementioned R Crumb. My accusation of artists being lazy is leveled mainly at those who SAY how badly they "want to break into comics" and wrack their brains trying to be thought provoking and innovative in their storytelling, when they simply have to "go with what they know" in order to write a decent story. I have a friend, a brilliant artist, well trained, knows how to tell a story visually, yet insists in speaking in someone elses voice.